A-Level/JC Physics Tuition Singapore/H2 Physics Tuition/JC Physics Tutor

Home Forums A Level Tuition, O Level Tuition @ Kovan / Hougang A-Level/JC Physics Tuition Singapore/H2 Physics Tuition/JC Physics Tutor

This topic contains 97 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  admin 2 years, 2 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 76 through 90 (of 98 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #4370

    admin
    Member

    A-Level Physics Tuition Singapore/H2 Physics Tuition/JC Physics Tutor

    Hi A-level/H2/JC Physics Tuition students

    Mastering Qualitative Questions

    Chapter 11 Superposition

    1. Briefly explain how an interference pattern may be obtained when waves from two sources meet. [2]

    2. It is not possible to observe interference fringes between light beams which are planepolarised in perpendicular planes. Explain. [2]

    3. A progressive sound wave of wavelength l is incident on an open pipe as shown below. The length of the pipe is l. A stationary wave is formed in the pipe. Explain the formation of the stationary wave in the pipe. [3]

    4. Light of wavelength 650 nm is incident normally on a double slit arrangement. The interference fringes formed are viewed on a screen placed parallel to and at a distance of 1.60 m from the double slit.
    Describe the changes (s) to the fringes if
    a. both slits are made narrower whilst keeping the slit separation constant [1]
    b. the light emerging from one of the two slits is reduced in intensity to half of its previous value [2]
    c. both slits are covered with sheets of polaroid and that in front of one of the slits is slowly rotated. [1]

    5 Two sources S1 and S2 produce waves of the same frequency on the surface of some water. State three conditions that must be satisfied from waves from the two sources to produce an OBSERVABLE interference pattern on the water surface. [3]

    6 Show how the principle of superposition of waves can be used to explain the formation of two sources interference fringes. [3]

    7. Sound waves and water waves can go round corners but light waves seem to travel only in straight lines. [2]

    8. Explain why a pillar in a concert hall can block the view of the audience but it has little effect on their hearing

    9. Explain what is meant by diffraction of waves.

    For the above questions models answer, please contact Mr Ong @9863 9633

    #4435

    admin
    Member

    A-Level Physics Tuition Singapore/H2 Physics Tuition/JC Physics Tutor

    Hi A-level/H2/JC Physics Tuition students

    Mastering Qualitative Questions

    Chapter 12 Current of Electricity

    1. A resistor of resistance R is connected across a battery of e.m.f. E and internal resistance r. The e.m.f. of the battery can be expressed as
    E = I (R + r)
    where I is the current through the circuit. Explain how this equation is consistent with the principle of conservation of energy.[2]

    2. In Singapore, the national voltage is set at 230 V while the American system uses 110 V. If a 2 kW kettle designed for use in Singapore is used in USA, suggest and explain any concerns in doing so. [2]

    For the above questions models answer, please contact Mr Ong @9863 9633

    #4475

    admin
    Member

    A-Level Physics Tuition Singapore/H2 Physics Tuition/JC Physics Tutor

    Hi A-level/H2/JC Physics Tuition students

    Mastering Qualitative Questions

    Chapter 14 Electric Field

    1. Electric field strength is defined as force per unit positive charge on a small test charge. Why is it necessary for the test charge to be small?

    2. Explain whether it is possible for the electric field strength to be zero at a point where the electric potential is not zero.

    3. Suggest why lightning is more likely to strike the tip of the lighthouse than any other places close to it. Given that the electric potential of the Earth surface is taken to be zero.

    For the above questions models answer, please contact Mr Ong @9863 9633

    #4532

    admin
    Member

    A-Level Physics Tuition Singapore/H2 Physics Tuition/JC Physics Tutor

    Hi A-level/H2/JC Physics Tuition students

    Mastering Qualitative Questions

    Chapter 15 Electromagnetism

    1. Explain how it is possible to select ions of a particular speed by changing the electric and magnetic fields. [3]

    2. Two straight parallel current-carrying conductors of equal length carrying currents in same direction, are placed next to each other. Explain, why forces exist between the two conductors. State the direction of the forces.

    3. A charged particle may experience a force in an electric field and in a magnetic field. State two differences between the forces experienced in the two types of field.

    For the above questions models answer, please contact Mr Ong @9863 9633

    #4596

    admin
    Member

    A-Level Physics Tuition Singapore/H2 Physics Tuition/JC Physics Tutor

    Hi A-level/H2/JC Physics Tuition students

    Mastering Qualitative Questions

    Chapter 16 Electromagnetic induction

    1. State Lenz’s Law and explain how it is directly related to the law of conservation of energy.

    2. State Faraday’s law of electromagnetic induction and hence explain why when the current in the coil A is switched on, the millivoltmeter connected to the neighbouring coil B indicates an induced e.m.f. for a short period of time.

    For the above questions models answer, please contact Mr Ong @9863 9633

    #4637

    admin
    Member

    A-Level Physics Tuition Singapore/H2 Physics Tuition/JC Physics Tutor

    Hi A-level/H2/JC Physics Tuition students

    Mastering Qualitative Questions

    Chapter 17 Alternating current

    1. State an advantage of using alternating current for the transmission of electrical energy. [1]

    2. Explain why high voltage is used in the transmission of electrical energy. [2]

    3. Explain what is meant by root-mean-square voltage when applied to a sinusoidal alternating voltage.

    For the above questions models answer, please contact Mr Ong @9863 9633

    #4696

    admin
    Member

    A-Level Physics Tuition Singapore/H2 Physics Tuition/JC Physics Tutor

    Hi A-level/H2/JC Physics Tuition students

    Mastering Qualitative Questions

    Chapter 18 Quantum Physics 1

    1. Distinguish emission & absorption line spectra

    2. Summarise the experimental evidence that suggests the existence of energy levels in atoms

    3. Explain the origins of characteristic lines & cut off wavelength

    4. Explain how the following observation of the photoelectric effect provide evidence that electromagnetic radiation has a particulate nature:

    There is no noticeable time lag between illumination and the emission of electrons,irrespective of the light intensity.

    5 State what is meant by the photoelectric effect and describe how it provides evidence for the particulate nature of electromagnetic radiation when it is interacting with matter.

    For the above questions models answer, please contact Mr Ong @9863 9633

    #4734

    admin
    Member

    A-Level Physics Tuition Singapore/H2 Physics Tuition/JC Physics Tutor

    Hi A-level/H2/JC Physics Tuition students

    Mastering Qualitative Questions

    Chapter 18 Quantum Physics 2

    6. The Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) is a stylus-type instrument in which a sharp probe is scanned across a sample to detect changes in the surface structure on the atomic scale. Explain using the concept of quantum tunneling, how the STM detects changes in the topography of the surface

    7. How does photoelectric effect provides evidence for the particulate nature of electromagnetic radiation?

    8. Explain what is meant by a potential barrier.

    9. Discuss how the wave nature of particles allows for barrier tunnelling.

    10. A carbon film is situated normally to the path of a parallel beam of electrons, all travelling at the same speed. The beam and the film are enclosed in a glass envelope which has a fluorescent screen at one end. The scattering of the electrons by the film is observed on
    the fluorescent screen.
    (a) Suggest what would be seen on the screen if the electrons behave as particles.
    (b) Briefly describe the pattern that will be observed on the screen
    (c) If the speed of the electrons is gradually increases, explain the changes, if any, that would be observed in the pattern on the screen.

    For the above questions models answer, please contact Mr Ong @9863 9633

    #4809

    admin
    Member

    A-Level Physics Tuition Singapore/H2 Physics Tuition/JC Physics Tutor

    Hi A-level/H2/JC Physics Tuition students

    Mastering Qualitative Questions

    Chapter 19 Lasers and Semiconductors Part 1

    1. Explain how laser action is achieved.

    2. Explain why the energy of electrons in solids is represented by energy bands, whereas those in isolated gas atoms are represented by discrete energy levels.

    3. Compare the conditions under which the optical emission line spectra and the characteristic x-ray spectra are produced.

    4. Using the ideas of population inversion and stimulated emission, explain how a laser could deliver an intense and directed light beam.

    5 The existence of the line spectra as demonstrated in (a) is an example for spontaneous emission. Einstein in 1917 published his groundbreaking paper on the basic principles of stimulated emission. Explain clearly how does stimulated emission occur.

    For the above questions models answer, please contact Mr Ong @9863 9633

    #4869

    admin
    Member

    A-Level Physics Tuition Singapore/H2 Physics Tuition/JC Physics Tutor

    Hi A-level/H2/JC Physics Tuition students

    Mastering Qualitative Questions

    Chapter 19 Lasers and Semiconductors Part 2

    6. Explain what is meant by population inversion and why it is necessary to produce amplification of light. [3]

    7. Give two reasons why a 1 W laser may appear brighter than a 10 W filament lamp. [2]

    8. State two differences between p-type semiconductors and n-type semiconductors. [2]

    9. A p-n diode is connected to an alternating supply. Explain with suitable diagrams how it works.

    For the above questions models answer, please contact Mr Ong @9863 9633

    #4911

    admin
    Member

    A-Level Physics Tuition Singapore/H2 Physics Tuition/JC Physics Tutor

    Hi A-level/H2/JC Physics Tuition students

    Mastering Qualitative Questions

    Chapter 20 Nuclear Physics

    1. Describe how two samples, one emitting alpha particles, and the other emitting beta particles can be distinguished through a simple school laboratory experiment, using a Geiger-Muller (GM) tube connected to a ratemeter. [3]

    2. State one similarity and one difference between radioactive decay and nuclear fission.

    3. Distinguish between the radioactive decay and the fission of a nucleus

    4. Explain why tracks due to gamma radiation in a cloud chamber are hardly visible.

    5. Why energy released during Nuclear Fusion is more than Nuclear Fission?

    6. What are the Quantities that must be conserved in any radioactive decay process

    For the above questions models answer, please contact Mr Ong @9863 9633

    #4934

    admin
    Member

    A-Level Physics Tuition Singapore/H2 Physics Tuition/JC Physics Tutor

    Hi A-level/H2/JC Physics Tuition students

    Topic 1 : Physical Quantities and Units – Part 1

    1. All physical quantities consists of a numerical magnitude and a unit.

    2. Base Quantities
    A base quantity is defined in terms of a standard. It is not defined in terms of other physical quantities.

    The are seven base units defined in the SI system.

    Base Quantity Unit
    Name Symbol
    Mass kilogram kg
    Length meter m
    Time second s
    Electric Current ampere A
    Temperature kelvin K
    Amount of Substance mole mol
    Luminous Intensity candela cd

    3. Derived Quantities
    A derived quantity in Physics can be obtained from the multiplication or division of the base quantities; no numerical factors are involved.

    4. Homogeneity of physical equations

    A physically correct equation must be homogenous.

    A physical equation is said to be homogeneous if each of the terms separated by plus, minus or equality signs on the left and right side of the equation has the same dimensions, i.e., have the same base units.

    i.e If the equation A = B + C is homogenous, than the units of A = the units of B = the units of C
    Note that you cannot add units together.

    If you need the complete summary note please contact Mr Ong @98639633

    #4993

    admin
    Member

    A-Level Physics Tuition Singapore/H2 Physics Tuition/JC Physics Tutor

    Hi A-level/H2/JC Physics Tuition students

    Two types of Error

    1) Systematic Error

    A systematic error is one that occurs according to some definite pattern. Errors of this type occur according to some fixed rule or pattern such that they yield a consistent over-estimation or underestimation of the true value of the measured quantity.

    Sources of Systematic Errors:

    (a) Incorrect calibration of an instrument
    e.g. bias caused by friction or wear in its moving parts.

    (b) Construction faults in the instrument These instrumental faults caused zero errors when the indicator or pointer of the instrument
    is not at the ‘zero’ position before the start of a measurement. An example is the off-centre pivoting of the pointer of the ammeter.

    (c) Non-constancy of experimental conditions
    e.g. change of temperature and pressure which affects the value of the quantity measured and has not been properly taken into account.

    (d) Biasness of the observer e.g. tendency of some persons to press a stopwatch a fraction of a second too early or to overestimate or underestimate the fraction of a scale division.

    (e) Incorrect experimental procedure or technique
    e.g. parallax error that occur due to wrong positioning of the eye when taking readings.

    2. Random Error

    A random error is one that occurs without a fixed pattern. It has an equal chance of being negative or positive and it causes a set of measurements done under the same conditions to have an equally likely chance of being greater or less than the true value.

    Examples of random error:

    (a) Random variations in external experimental conditions
    e.g. disturbances caused by mechanical vibrations, tremors produced by the wind

    (b) Non-constancy of experimental specimen
    e.g. non-uniform diameter of cylindrical specimen

    (c) Random human error
    e.g. misjudgment in the interpolation of the smallest division of the scale of measuring instruments, error due to starting and stopping of a stopwatch in reaction to visual observation

    Since random error have an equal probability of being positive or negative, it can be reduced by taking a large number of independent readings of a quantity. Their mean or average is then almost entirely free from random errors and gives the best estimate for the value of the quantity being measured.

    If you need the complete summary note please contact Mr Ong @98639633

    #5136

    admin
    Member

    A-Level Physics Tuition Singapore/H2 Physics Tuition/JC Physics Tutor

    Hi A-level/H2/JC Physics Tuition students

    2014 Aug A level Physics Intensive Revision

    31-Jul Thu 7.30pm to 9.30pm 2 hrs Electromagnetism/EMI/AC

    2-Aug Sat 9am to 11am 2 hrs Electromagnetism/EMI/AC

    2-Aug Sat 7.30pm to 9.30pm 2 hrs Waves

    3-Aug Sun 12pm to 2pm 2 hrs Waves

    3-Aug Sun 2pm to 4pm 2 hrs Electromagnetism/EMI/AC

    7-Aug Thu 7.30pm to 9.30pm 2 hrs Direct Current & Current of Electricity

    9-Aug Sat 9am to 11am 2 hrs Direct Current & Current of Electricity

    9-Aug Sat 7.30pm to 9.30pm 2 hrs Oscillations

    10-Aug Sun 12pm to 2pm 2 hrs Oscillations

    10-Aug Sun 2pm to 4pm 2 hrs Direct Current & Current of Electricity

    14-Aug Thu 7.30pm to 9.30pm 2 hrs Quantum/Nuclear/Planning

    16-Aug Sat 9am to 11am 2 hrs Quantum/Nuclear/Planning

    16-Aug Sat 7.30pm to 9.30pm 2 hrs Superposition 1

    17-Aug Sun 12pm to 2pm 2 hrs Superposition 1

    17-Aug Sun 2pm to 4pm 2 hrs Quantum/Nuclear/Planning

    21-Aug Thu 7.30pm to 9.30pm 2 hrs Lasers and Semiconductors

    23-Aug Sat 9am to 11am 2 hrs Lasers and Semiconductors

    23-Aug Sat 7.30pm to 9.30pm 2 hrs Superposition 2

    24-Aug Sun 12pm to 2pm 2 hrs Superposition 2

    24-Aug Sun 2pm to 4pm 2 hrs Lasers and Semiconductors

    28-Aug Thu 7.30pm to 9.30pm 2 hrs Planning

    30-Aug Sat 9am to 11am 2 hrs Planning

    30-Aug Sat 7.30pm to 9.30pm 2 hrs Forces and Work Done, Energy, Power

    31-Aug Sun 12pm to 2pm 2 hrs Forces and Work Done, Energy, Power

    31-Aug Sun 2pm to 4pm 2 hrs Planning

    If you need help in Physics please contact Mr Ong @98639633

    #5449

    admin
    Member

    A-Level Physics Tuition Singapore/H2 Physics Tuition/JC Physics Tutor

    Hi A-level/H2/JC Physics Tuition students

    Mastering Qualitative Questions

    Topic 1: Measurement Part 1

    1. What are systematic / random errors? How can they be eliminated?

    Systematic Errors

    Errors of measurement which result in all readings being consistent overestimates or underestimates of its true value.

    Cannot be reduced by taking repeated readings.

    Can be reduced or eliminated by careful experimental design or good experimental techniques.

    Examples: apparatus (zero errors, poor calibration), poor experimental technique (consistent parallax error), external factors (air resistance, background radioactive count rate).

    Small systematic errors mean good accuracy.

    Random Errors

    Errors of measurement which cause an unpredictable scatter of readings about a mean value.

    Can be reduced by taking repeated readings and finding the average

    Cannot be eliminated.

    Examples: Inconsistent reaction time, random parallax error, environmental conditions (fluctuations in measurement), limited sensitivity of instruments.

    Small random errors mean good precision.

    If you need help in Physics please contact Mr Ong @98639633

Viewing 15 posts - 76 through 90 (of 98 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Comments are closed.