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  • #4867

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    A Level GP/General Paper Tuition Singapore

    Is Violence Against Women a Priority in Political Agendas?

    The reality shows that it should be, according to United Nations, 7 out of 10 women experience physical or sexual violence in their lifetime – the majority by someone they know. Acts of violence against women aged between 15 to 44, cause more deaths and disabilities than cancer, malaria, traffic accidents and war combined. Despite its magnitude, this issue occupies a marginal space in public agendas around the world and in many places it continues to be considered a domestic – private – problem. Politicians have the responsibility to take measures that contributive to stop this global threat and citizens have the responsibility to reject it.

    This is a problem that affects not only poor and underdeveloped countries, but also the richest nations in the world. In the United States, during the last decade 11,766 women were killed as a result of domestic violence – almost double of U.S. troops killed in Afghanistan and Iraq in the same period of time. Additionally, 1 in 4 women have reported intimate partner violence. In Europe, 25% of citizens know a woman within their circle of friends and family who has been a victim of domestic violence – in the case of Sweden, Finland and the UK this percentage is around 40%.

    In Latin America, according to the Organization of American States, each day 460 persons are victims of rape – probably mostly women. Colombia has a daily average of 245 women who are victims of some kind of violence; in the last decade almost 400 thousand suffered some form of abuse. In Mexico, 5 out of 10 women aged 15 or older have suffered violence from their partner. Only in 2009, in the middle of the drug war, UN Women denounced the occurrence of 1.859 femicides in this country. In Brazil, 6 out of 10 citizens know a woman who has been a victim of domestic violence.

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    #4908

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    Unit Practice: Author’s Intention

    Writers always aim to achieve a certain specific effect with each sentence or phrase. They carefully choose words, phrases, images, analogies, examples and even punctuation in order to achieve this. This not only adds layers of meaning to the text, but also lends precision—the reader is guided along the author’s line of thought with the thoughtful and strategic placement of language features.

    The Author’s Intention question type is designed to test your sensitivity to language and to reward your ability to accurately distill

    (1) the reason for the author’s approach or the effect the author aims to achieve, and often you are also required to

    (2) explain the context or meaning of the language feature used to achieve it. Accurately tracking the writer’s ideas as well as his (positive or negative) attitude to the subject of the sentence can help you deduce his intentions in using these language features to present information.

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    #4932

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    A Level GP/General Paper Tuition Singapore

    The nutrition puzzle

    THINK. As you read article 1, consider these questions:
    o What are the effects of malnutrition?
    o What are some measures to improve nutrition and what are the challenges faced?

    In Eldorado, one of São Paulo’s poorest and most misleadingly named favelas, some eight-year-old boys are playing football on a patch of ground once better known for drug gangs and hunger. Although they look the picture of health, they are not. After the match they gather around a sack of bananas beside the pitch. “At school, the kids get a full meal every day,” explains Jonathan Hannay, the secretary-general of Children at Risk Foundation, a local charity. “But in the holidays they come to us without breakfast or lunch so we give them bananas. They are filling, cheap, and they stimulate the brain.” Malnutrition used to be pervasive and invisible in Eldorado. Now there is less of it and, equally important, it is no longer hidden. “It has become more visible—so people are doing something about it.”

    If Eldorado’s slum children today eat better, it is partly thanks to José Graziano da Silva. He ran Brazil’s Fome Zero(zero hunger) campaign, a policy that has helped to cut hunger by more than a third in Latin America’s largest country. Now Mr Graziano wants to apply the lessons he has learned more widely: he recently took over as head of the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO). And he stands a better chance of success than his predecessors. His appointment coincides with a shift in the world’s approach to fighting hunger.

    Governments around the world are paying increasing attention to nutrition. In 2010 donors, charities and companies drew up a how-to policy guide called SUN (which stands for scale up nutrition). Britain’s Department for International Development and other aid agencies are devoting more of their money to nutritional projects. The World Bank has nailed its colours to the mast with a book called “Repositioning Nutrition as Central to Development”. Save the Children, an international charity, talks about “galvanising political leadership” behind the effort. Underlying all this is a change in thinking about how best to improve nutrition, with less stress on providing extra calories and food and more on improving nutrition by supplying micro-nutrients such as iron and vitamins.

    In many countries nutritional standards vary according to the season. Often both the amount and quality of food drop alarmingly in the months before the main harvest. Nutrition varies also within households. Mothers eat less in bad times to leave more for their older children, which harms the suckling child. Culture adds to the problem. In rural Bangladesh an attempt to improve nutrition by educating young mothers backfired, because the family diet turns out to be determined not by mothers, but by mothers-in-law. And nutrition can also be improved in all sorts of ways, including by better sanitation, which reduces intestinal diseases and enables people to absorb more nutrients; by investing in smallholder farming, to increase dietary variety; by vaccinating children against diseases; by educating women to breastfeed babies for longer, to improve immunity. Marie Ruel, of the International Food Policy Research Institute in Washington, DC, ticks off some of the tasks: focus on the first 1,000 days of life (including pregnancy); scale up maternal-health programmes and the teaching of good feeding practices; concentrate on the poor; measure and monitor the problem.

    All this implies that a successful effort to improve nutrition has to push all the buttons at once. Brazil’s Fome Zero has 90 separate programmes run by 19 ministries. It embraces everything from a conditional cash-transfer scheme, called Bolsa Família, to irrigation projects and help for smallholders. Such an effort is hard to organise and cannot work unless politicians support it. “Malnutrition reduction needs powerful champions who know how to get things done across government, avoid gobbledygook and finish the story,” says Lawrence Haddad, director of Britain’s Institute of Development Studies.

    Hence the importance of Mr Graziano, the FAO’s new boss. Interest in improving nutrition is growing; so is alarm at the failures of fighting malnutrition so far. He will not find it easy to cajole more countries into a large, broad-based effort. Governments are reluctant to change and want clear evidence. And just as the damage from malnutrition builds up over a lifetime, so better nutrition reveals its benefits only over many years, as well-fed mothers pass on good health to well-fed children. At a recent FAO conference someone was heard to remark that “at the moment nutritionists are in a position similar to environmentalists in the 1990s.” That is depressing, because it means progress will be slow; but it is encouraging, because progress will come eventually.

    APPLY. Now, try answering this essay question: To what extent is the individual responsible for his own health?

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    #4991

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    A Level GP/General Paper Tuition Singapore

    Use of figurative language

    Writers often make use of figurative language or figures of speech in order to convey their meaning more effectively. Figurative language is impactful because it allows a writer to explain abstract ideas by linking them (drawing an analogy) to more concrete, familiar, everyday items. For instance, an abstract concept like life is often described as a journey where there are different paths that a person can take. Similarly, another abstract concept like love is often compared to roses.

    So, figurative language comprises of two parts: (1) the abstract idea that the writer intends to describe, and (2) the more concrete meaning of the word/phrase in context. Figurative language can take many forms, including metaphors, similes and idioms (this list is not exhaustive). In P2, answers to questions involving the use of figurative language require first an explanation of the analogy, followed by an explanation of how the abstract idea is related to or linked to it. The two parts should not be described or elaborated using the exact same words because that means the meaning of the metaphor has not been fully contextualized or explained

    Example 1

    1. Like the rings embedded within a tree’s trunk which one can only see by slicing the trunk open, it’s only by dissecting the concept of tolerance that one becomes aware of the magnitude of meanings nestled within it. (lines 13-15)

    Explain why the author compares ‘the concept of tolerance’ to ‘a tree trunk’.

    a) A tree trunk, despite appearing as a solid whole, actually contains patterns and layers only visible when it is cut open.
    Key Idea: Additional information about the tree can be obtained when it is sliced open
    b) Similarly, tolerance as a concept appears simple and uncomplicated but upon closer examination is revealed to be complex and nuanced.
    Key Idea: Explain the complexity present in Tolerance

    If you need more examples Please contact Angie 96790479 or Mr Ong 98639633

    #5134

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    A Level GP/General Paper Tuition Singapore

    E-GP Review

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    #5447

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    Education vs. Schooling

    The debate about public education misses a critical issue. Are students attending the public schools becoming well-educated or well-schooled? There’s a difference; one that is seminal in determining almost every other discussion about public education.

    The current emphasis on test scores to determine whether a child is getting a good education has narrowed the definition of education. The assumption is: if children do well on standardized tests, then they are well educated. But that assumption may be false. Here’s why.

    There’s more than a critical difference between being well-educated or well-schooled. Take a look at Enron, where individuals with degrees from highfalutin colleges and universities cooked the books, were deceitful in reporting their metrics, and bilked employees out of their retirement funds. All of them passed standardized tests and demonstrated acumen in reading, math, business and finance. The question is: were they well-educated?

    Or take politics. There are many examples of administrations packed with the “best and brightest” individuals with law degrees and doctorates who have demonstrated their knowledge of facts, concepts, and theories. The Nixon, Reagan, Clinton and both Bush administrations have had smart people make foolish decisions and, even, unethical and illegal ones. Members of Congress, the vast majority with college degrees, succumb to the allure of financial influence and pressure from lobbyists and political insiders. The
    question is: were they well-educated or well schooled?

    Certainly in these examples, individuals are working in complex and high-pressure situations that call for more than literacy and simply mastery of facts or concepts. But all of us live in an increasingly complex world that requires more than “smarts” or “shrewdness”. What is necessary is wisdom, a term seldom heard today in discussions about education.

    For complete articles Please contact Angie 96790479 or Mr Ong 98639633

    #5571

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    A Level GP/General Paper Tuition Singapore

    2015 A level General Paper

    J1/J2 H1 THU 7.30pm – 9.30pm

    J1/J2 H1 SUN 4pm – 6pm

    Please contact Angie @ 96790479 or Mr Ong @ 98639633 if you need help in General paper

    #5678

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    A Level GP/General Paper Tuition Singapore

    Due to popular demand, additional new class is added on Saturday

    J1/J2 H1 Sat 3.30pm to 5.30pm

    Please contact Angie @ 96790479 or Mr Ong @ 98639633 if you need help in General paper

    #6770

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    A Level GP/General Paper Tuition Singapore

    Question 1: Are women more disadvantaged than men in your society? (Singapore)

    Topic: male & female issues in your society
    Issue: whether women are more disadvantaged
    Context: your society
    Keywords: more disadvantaged

    Definition of disadvantaged (OED): An unfavourable circumstance or condition that reduces the chances of success.

    Yes – Women are more disadvantaged

    1. Women are seen as a liability to their work which thus affects their opportunities at a career

    a. Discriminatory practices against pregnant employees still occur in this day and age
    i. In 2011, MOM received 112 pregnancy and maternity-related complaints compared to 84 in 2010. On average, there have been 97 complaints each year between 2006 and 2010, with the highest number recorded in 2009
    http://www.hrmasia.com/forum/pregnant-youre-fired/128433/

    2. Women are perceived to have a tougher time dealing with the societal expectations of beauty

    a. Notions of beauty in the Singapore context: Slim, tall, thigh gap, fair…
    b. Because of these pressures of conforming to the perception of beauty, women are more likely to fall prey to beauty related illnesses e.g. anorexia, bulimia, depression…
    i. Figures from the Singapore General Hospital (SGH) show that 95 youngsters aged 13 to 19 suffered from anorexia or bulimia last year, up from 65 in 2011 and 75 the year before.
    http://www.straitstimes.com/breaking-news/singapore/story/more-youngsters-diagnosed-eating-disorders-20131013
    ii. Angeline Yap Siling (Ms World Singapore 2014 finalist) – suffered from anorexia from the tender age of 15 because of society’s perceived notion of beauty. Had to battle with her illness for seven years before making a comeback
    http://yourhealth.asiaone.com/content/miss-world-singapore-finalist-was-anorexic

    No – women are not more disadvantaged (does not necessarily mean they have an advantage either)

    1. Meritocracy is an ideal that is practiced in many aspects of society
    a. In school, career etc meritocracy is practiced. This means that women have equal opportunities as men. For example, in the public service sector, employees are put into different grades that can be roughly mapped to experience. Those who work harder and take up more responsibilities are promoted faster and thus move up the grades quicker. Using this type of meritocratic system, both men and women have equal opportunities, thus women are not more disadvantaged than men.
    This notion is also applicable in the education context, where students, regardless of gender are able to receive monetary and other forms of rewards based on their results, which can be seen as a tangible measure of how hard a student works.

    2. Women can be seen to be in a position of greater advantage as they are better protected by the law.

    a. Women’s Charter is a legislative act that was passed in 1961 to protect and advance the rights of women and girls in Singapore. It is a wide-ranking charter that brings together the regulation of the relationship between husband and wife and the relationship between parents and their children, termination of marriages and division of matrimonial assets. It covers areas such as child custody, divorce and matrimonial rights.

    3. Women are recognised for their outstanding contributions to society

    a. Her World magazine organises the Women of the Year award and gives them to women who have a positive impact on the community through their selfless dedication and unflagging spirit.
    b. E.g. Rachel Eng 2014 winner – notable contribution as a mother of three and as a dedicated legal professional.
    c. Comparatively, there is no such award for men. This could suggest that women are at a greater advantage since the recognition could open the route to more opportunities in career or social aspects.
    d. In addition to the womens’ awards, there are also other awards that have seen women awardees. E.g. The prestigious cultural medallion was presented to Jennifer Tham in 2012 to recognise her achievements in artistic excellence in the music scene in Singapore

    For complete articles Please contact Angie 96790479 or Mr Ong 98639633

    #6801

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    A Level GP/General Paper Tuition Singapore

    PAPER 1

    Answer one question from this Paper.
    Answers should be between 500 and 800 words in length.

    1. Do you agree that the world would be a better place without religion?

    2. Consider the view that historical buildings and monuments have no place in your society today.

    3. How far should governments have the right to monitor what is being said online?

    4. ‘A multicultural society gives rise to more problems than benefits.’ Comment.

    5. ‘The family should be solely responsible for taking care of the elderly.’ Do you agree?

    6. How important is funding in determining sporting excellence?

    7. ‘The key to a successful business is advertising.’ Discuss.

    8. Can the use of animals in scientific research ever be justified?

    9. ‘The youth of today are forced to grow up too quickly.’ Do you agree?

    10. How effective are harsh punishments in dealing with crime?

    11. Is obedience always a virtue?

    12. Consider the view that gender equality could and should be achieved in today’s world.

    For model essay Please contact Angie 96790479 or Mr Ong 98639633

    #6857

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    A Level GP/General Paper Tuition Singapore

    Question 1: Are women more disadvantaged than men in your society? (Singapore)

    Topic: male & female issues in your society
    Issue: whether women are more disadvantaged
    Context: your society
    Keywords: more disadvantaged

    Definition of disadvantaged (OED): An unfavourable circumstance or condition that reduces the chances of success.

    Yes – Women are more disadvantaged

    1. Women are seen as a liability to their work which thus affects their opportunities at a career

    a. Discriminatory practices against pregnant employees still occur in this day and age
    i. In 2011, MOM received 112 pregnancy and maternity-related complaints compared to 84 in 2010. On average, there have been 97 complaints each year between 2006 and 2010, with the highest number recorded in 2009
    http://www.hrmasia.com/forum/pregnant-youre-fired/128433/

    2. Women are perceived to have a tougher time dealing with the societal expectations of beauty

    a. Notions of beauty in the Singapore context: Slim, tall, thigh gap, fair…
    b. Because of these pressures of conforming to the perception of beauty, women are more likely to fall prey to beauty related illnesses e.g. anorexia, bulimia, depression…
    i. Figures from the Singapore General Hospital (SGH) show that 95 youngsters aged 13 to 19 suffered from anorexia or bulimia last year, up from 65 in 2011 and 75 the year before.
    http://www.straitstimes.com/breaking-news/singapore/story/more-youngsters-diagnosed-eating-disorders-20131013
    ii. Angeline Yap Siling (Ms World Singapore 2014 finalist) – suffered from anorexia from the tender age of 15 because of society’s perceived notion of beauty. Had to battle with her illness for seven years before making a comeback
    http://yourhealth.asiaone.com/content/miss-world-singapore-finalist-was-anorexic

    No – women are not more disadvantaged (does not necessarily mean they have an advantage either)

    1. Meritocracy is an ideal that is practiced in many aspects of society
    a. In school, career etc meritocracy is practiced. This means that women have equal opportunities as men. For example, in the public service sector, employees are put into different grades that can be roughly mapped to experience. Those who work harder and take up more responsibilities are promoted faster and thus move up the grades quicker. Using this type of meritocratic system, both men and women have equal opportunities, thus women are not more disadvantaged than men.
    This notion is also applicable in the education context, where students, regardless of gender are able to receive monetary and other forms of rewards based on their results, which can be seen as a tangible measure of how hard a student works.

    2. Women can be seen to be in a position of greater advantage as they are better protected by the law.

    a. Women’s Charter is a legislative act that was passed in 1961 to protect and advance the rights of women and girls in Singapore. It is a wide-ranking charter that brings together the regulation of the relationship between husband and wife and the relationship between parents and their children, termination of marriages and division of matrimonial assets. It covers areas such as child custody, divorce and matrimonial rights.

    3. Women are recognised for their outstanding contributions to society

    a. Her World magazine organises the Women of the Year award and gives them to women who have a positive impact on the community through their selfless dedication and unflagging spirit.
    b. E.g. Rachel Eng 2014 winner – notable contribution as a mother of three and as a dedicated legal professional.
    c. Comparatively, there is no such award for men. This could suggest that women are at a greater advantage since the recognition could open the route to more opportunities in career or social aspects.
    d. In addition to the womens’ awards, there are also other awards that have seen women awardees. E.g. The prestigious cultural medallion was presented to Jennifer Tham in 2012 to recognise her achievements in artistic excellence in the music scene in Singapore

    For model essay Please contact Angie 96790479 or Mr Ong 98639633

    #7094

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    A Level GP/General Paper Tuition Singapore

    JC1 Promo Exams and JC2 Prelim Exams Preparatory Classes

    for General Paper.

    Open for Registration Now!

    Call Angie @96790479 or Mr Ong @98639633

    #7531

    admin
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    A-Level Tuition Singapore/GP Tuition/General Paper Tutor

    Most of us would know that driving a vehicle, switching on the lights would have a carbon footprint. However, carbon footprint also exists for electronics usage. It’s just that we probably don’t perceive the sending of an e-mail or forwarding of a text message to also leave a carbon footprint. Find out more about how much carbon footprint we leave by reading this article. Perhaps our online activities are not as environmentally friendly as what it appears to be.

    For more information on GP Tuition Classes / Secondary English Tuition Classes conducted by Mr Aaron, click here to view his profile and call 96790479 or 98639633 to enquire.

    #7640

    admin
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    A-Level Tuition Singapore/GP Tuition/General Paper Tutor

    A picture is always more powerful than mere words.’ What is your view?

    A picture is worth a thousand words’ is an oft-bandied maxim which depicts the power images hold to convey messages, ideas and opinions to people. Since the dawn of mankind, pictures have been used to communicate, a classic example being
    the Palaeolithic cave paintings our prehistoric ancestors used to create. With
    the advent of modern technology, pictures today take a multitude of different
    forms. The creation of new methods of capturing a moment in time on canvas
    has become even more complex and intricate and the invention of cameras has
    paved the way for an entirely new form of pictures in the form of photographs. With such technological advances in the ability of pictures to purposefully deliver content and convey thoughts, it does seem like a picture can be more powerful than the spoken or written word. However, this is not always the case as words are also undeniably an important form of communication that is biquitous throughout the entire world.

    For complete essay please contact Mr Ong @ 98639633

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